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Initial research on FastAPI

I already used Flask in the past. I know about the extensive usage of DJango Framework in the Python community. Both are decent frameworks for web and API development in the Python world. As usual, at the beginning of a new project, I was unconsciously checking out the health and relevance of my technology selection. I came across FastAPI framework and noticed it because of the following facts:

  1. Selected in InfoWorld Best Open Source Software Award 2021.
  2. Simplicity of Flask.
  3. Faster than Flask as it uses ASGI (Asynchronous Server Gateway Interface).
  4. Adaptation among large product companies like Uber, Netflix and others.
  5. More than 38K stars on Github as on 17 Nov 2021. Remember Flask has more than 55K stars on Github. FastAPI is catching up fast.
  6. More to come.

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